Menu Close

Whistleblower echoes Facebook lacks one essential component to make the app secure.

Whistleblower echoes Facebook lacks one essential component to make the app secure.
Advertisement

Whistleblower echoes Facebook lacks one essential component to make the app secure. Whistleblower, Frances Haugen, confirms Facebook is missing one critical component that would make the app secure.

Former Facebook product manager turned whistleblower Frances Haugen claims the business lacks the drive to make its apps secure for consumers. Haugen, 37, rose to fame earlier this month after revealing herself to be the source of a series of Wall Street Journal investigations that dug into several internal Facebook research projects, detailing what the corporation knew about its platform and its dangers.

Since then, the papers, nicknamed the Facebook Papers, have become the subject of reporting by many sites, with tales ranging from dwindling teen Facebook user numbers to charges that CEO Mark Zuckerberg has prioritized development before safety. The Facebook Papers have been distributed to the US Securities and Exchange Commission, US politicians, and a number of periodicals, leaving Facebook with various avenues of defense. In early October, Haugen spoke before a Senate committee, saying she wanted to help repair Facebook rather than harm it.

Shortly after, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg wrote on the site, asserting that the company does not “deliberately push stuff that makes people upset,” and that such an action would be “profoundly nonsensical.” Zuckerberg’s answer was insufficient to stem the flow, and Haugen has subsequently agreed to meet with the company’s Oversight Board. Haugen was in London yesterday to speak with British politicians on Facebook and what she has learnt about how it works. According to Haugen, the company’s major priority is revenue, implying that the company’s leadership lacks the desire “to ensure these systems are managed in a sufficiently safe manner.”

Advertisement

The whistleblower also expressed her reservations that Facebook subsidiary Instagram would be able to establish a service suitable for children under the age of 13. The notion comes in the wake of Facebook’s decision to halt work on Instagram Kids, a pre-teen app.Haugen also raised concerns with US Senators, including the prospect that Facebook’s suite of tools may be used to radicalize people. “I’m afraid that they’ve built a product that will pull people away from their true communities,” Haugen said, leading them into “rabbit holes and filter bubbles.”

She also advocated on Facebook to do more to battle misinformation and dangerous content. Haugen reiterated her intention for the implementation of external regulation for social media sites, as she has previously said. The whistleblower states that while Facebook is full of “wonderful, loving, concerned individuals,” the firm is designed in such a manner that profit motives trump any significant safety precautions.

Recommended:“You’re not bigger than covid” Florida Surgeon General thrown out of a meeting after refusing to wear mask.

That story is untrue, according to Facebook, which claims it invests substantially in steps to resolve issues on its platforms. However, with politicians on both sides of the Atlantic paying attention to Haugen, further legislation may be slowed.

Advertisement

SHARE:Whistleblower echoes Facebook lacks one essential component to make the app secure.

Comment Here